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Progressive Programming, Politics, Electronics, and Gardening.
May 29 '11
Walk along Delmar Boulevard in University City west of the Delmar Metrolink Station and you will encounter the Delmar Loop, where the sidewalks have these plaques on them representing the various people who make up the St. Louis Walk of Fame.
Here you will find the beloved King of Horror, Vincent Price at 6509 Delmar Boulevard. The store that is in front of it sadly is not store dedicated to selling merchandise of the deceased actor or his fellow horrific costars, and is not the Vincent Price Art Museum. (That is in California.) Which is a bummer because Elvis Presley had Graceland in his home town of Memphis (yeah, I know. He was born in Tupelo) AND he has a street named after him! Yet he is just as celebrated with museums and look alike contest across the country and especially in Las Vegas.
Sure, there is a Price Road in St. Louis, but it is not named after Vincent Price because their are plenty of folks in the St. Louis area who’s last name is Price and either don’t have any relation to or have never come forward to state how they are related to Vincent Price.
There are probably three streets in St. Louis of people who are well know or whose full name appear on signage.
Lindbergh Boulevard in St. Louis County is named after the aviator Charles Lindbergh whose airplane was known as the Spirit of St. Louis.  Lucky Lindy has his own corner of the Missouri History Museum on display right now.
James Smith McDonnell is the reason why Brown Road in Hazelwood and Berkeley is now James S. McDonnell Boulevard (or as it is known by the locals just McDonnell Boulevard) who founded the McDonnell Aircraft Corporation (“MAC”) in 1939, which later merged with the Douglas Aircraft Corporation in 1967 to become Mcdonnell Douglas until it was tragically swallowed up by rival Boeing in 1997.
And let’s not forget that just about every major city in this country has a street named after the great civil rights activist Reverend Martin Luther King, Jr.  His legacy is the reason Natural Bridge Road in North St. Louis is named after him as well as a bridge connecting Laclede’s Landing with Venice, Illinois.  Sadly, the neighborhood along much of the Missouri side of the road isn’t the most docile. And it turns out there’s a strip club operated by a white supremacist group on the Illinois side, which is even more tragic than ironic considering that the majority of the population in Venice, Illinois is black.
Yet somehow, there is no road in the St. Louis Area named “Vincent Price Boulevard”. You would think the strech of North Warson Road or Ladue Road that runs along Mary Institute and Country Day School (MICDS) in Creve Couer would be named after him.  With his mark on Art, Acting, Cinema, Television, Music, and Cooking, you would think this master thespian would somehow woo a few city leaders to name something after him. Heck, even the part of Grand Boulevard that makes up the Grand Arts District near the Fox Theater where he performed.  And why rename Kiel Opera House after a dirty multinational energy corporation (Peabody Energy) who is one of the largest coal pollutors in this country? “The Vincent Price Opera House” sounds so much better.
Meanwhile, back to my story.  Star Clipper Comics in the Delmar Loop has a small gallery in the back part of the store where they feature illustrations by artists, comic book artists, even illustrators. If you have the time while in St. Louis, feel free to visit their Vincent Price exhibt featuring the art of Joel Robinson.
I figure this might be one of the last few Vincentennial tagged posts to this blog. It’s been quite fun sharing with you a St. Louisian’s point of view of one of our hometown heros.  For more Vincent Price fun (or Egg Magic), I would highly recommend following F*** Yeah Vincent Price Vincent F***ing Price's tumblr page.
Thank you for taking an interest in this tumblr page. Feel free to keep following the many other interests I have to bring to this blog!
Note: Made some corrections. My appologies to VFP for the mixup.

Walk along Delmar Boulevard in University City west of the Delmar Metrolink Station and you will encounter the Delmar Loop, where the sidewalks have these plaques on them representing the various people who make up the St. Louis Walk of Fame.

Here you will find the beloved King of Horror, Vincent Price at 6509 Delmar Boulevard. The store that is in front of it sadly is not store dedicated to selling merchandise of the deceased actor or his fellow horrific costars, and is not the Vincent Price Art Museum. (That is in California.) Which is a bummer because Elvis Presley had Graceland in his home town of Memphis (yeah, I know. He was born in Tupelo) AND he has a street named after him! Yet he is just as celebrated with museums and look alike contest across the country and especially in Las Vegas.

Sure, there is a Price Road in St. Louis, but it is not named after Vincent Price because their are plenty of folks in the St. Louis area who’s last name is Price and either don’t have any relation to or have never come forward to state how they are related to Vincent Price.

There are probably three streets in St. Louis of people who are well know or whose full name appear on signage.

Lindbergh Boulevard in St. Louis County is named after the aviator Charles Lindbergh whose airplane was known as the Spirit of St. Louis. Lucky Lindy has his own corner of the Missouri History Museum on display right now.

James Smith McDonnell is the reason why Brown Road in Hazelwood and Berkeley is now James S. McDonnell Boulevard (or as it is known by the locals just McDonnell Boulevard) who founded the McDonnell Aircraft Corporation (“MAC”) in 1939, which later merged with the Douglas Aircraft Corporation in 1967 to become Mcdonnell Douglas until it was tragically swallowed up by rival Boeing in 1997.

And let’s not forget that just about every major city in this country has a street named after the great civil rights activist Reverend Martin Luther King, Jr. His legacy is the reason Natural Bridge Road in North St. Louis is named after him as well as a bridge connecting Laclede’s Landing with Venice, Illinois. Sadly, the neighborhood along much of the Missouri side of the road isn’t the most docile. And it turns out there’s a strip club operated by a white supremacist group on the Illinois side, which is even more tragic than ironic considering that the majority of the population in Venice, Illinois is black.

Yet somehow, there is no road in the St. Louis Area named “Vincent Price Boulevard”. You would think the strech of North Warson Road or Ladue Road that runs along Mary Institute and Country Day School (MICDS) in Creve Couer would be named after him. With his mark on Art, Acting, Cinema, Television, Music, and Cooking, you would think this master thespian would somehow woo a few city leaders to name something after him. Heck, even the part of Grand Boulevard that makes up the Grand Arts District near the Fox Theater where he performed. And why rename Kiel Opera House after a dirty multinational energy corporation (Peabody Energy) who is one of the largest coal pollutors in this country? “The Vincent Price Opera House” sounds so much better.

Meanwhile, back to my story. Star Clipper Comics in the Delmar Loop has a small gallery in the back part of the store where they feature illustrations by artists, comic book artists, even illustrators. If you have the time while in St. Louis, feel free to visit their Vincent Price exhibt featuring the art of Joel Robinson.

I figure this might be one of the last few Vincentennial tagged posts to this blog. It’s been quite fun sharing with you a St. Louisian’s point of view of one of our hometown heros. For more Vincent Price fun (or Egg Magic), I would highly recommend following F*** Yeah Vincent Price Vincent F***ing Price's tumblr page.

Thank you for taking an interest in this tumblr page. Feel free to keep following the many other interests I have to bring to this blog!

Note: Made some corrections. My appologies to VFP for the mixup.

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